Full Chisel Blog

October 22, 2014

Dry Powdered Pigments for Restoration Work

I have received several requests for the dry powdered pigments I use and having mentioned them in my forth coming book, I decided to offer them for sale as a set.

dry powdered pigments

Black Iron Oxide, Red Iron Oxide, Yellow Ocher, Burnt Umber, & Zinc White.

These are the traditional pigments from the nineteenth century and earlier, zinc oxide is substituted for white lead, as some people won’t allow the sale of lead for some reason.

All natural earth pigments ground 900 fine, they are non-fugative and will not fade.  They are compatable with any medium: linseed oil and turpentine, shellac or spirit based varnish, oil based varnish [to make enamel], and water based finishes such as gum arabic or for distemper [hide glue size], etc.

Five one ounce (by weight) glass jars with metal lids, they are available here.

Stephen

October 17, 2014

Pre-publication Sale of The Spinning Wheel Repair Book

I am offering a pre-publication sale on the Spinning Wheel Repair Book which is going to the press soon.  I will be delivering these by the first week of December 2014.

Here is a mock up of the cover, color being added as we speak, original artwork by Tim Burnham.

freya1

For the first 25 orders I will include an 8.5″ by 11″ hand impressed copy of the hand set title page by Lauri Taylor of Loose Cannon Press, along with your order.

lauri title page3

The book is 8.5″ by 11″, 77 pages with 160 illustrations and 25 photographs.

The book can be ordered here at the Full Chisel Store, the price is $20.00 plus $6.00 domestic shipping.  International shipping charges apply.  The book will be shipped by early December, 2014.

Thanks to all of those who helped with this publication.

Stephen

October 7, 2014

The Spinning Wheel Repair Book

First of all I want to let everyone know everything is fine here, because I haven’t posted recently I have been receiving a lot of inquiries.  I have been busy finishing up my next book on Spinning Wheel Repair.

Here is a mock up of the hand set type title page, still in need some adjustment, it is being done by a friend.  The forward was written by a friend.  I am having the cover art finished up by another friend and one more technical part being done by another friend, thank goodness for friends.

lauri title page1

The book will be out in time for the holidays, but I am thinking of taking orders earlier.

Stephen

August 17, 2014

Expired Liquid Hide Glue, good after 13 years!

Filed under: Alchemy,Hide Glue,Historical Material,Of Interest,The Trade,Uncategorized — Stephen Shepherd @ 4:28 pm

A friend of mine showed me a bottle of Franklin/Titebond Liquid Hide Glue with an old expiration date and he thought it was still good.  I looked at the date and it was 7-01 and I thought  there was no way it was any good.  So I did the finger/thumb test and sure enough it exhibited ‘legging’ or ‘cottoning’ indicating it was still good.

Webbing

So the following day I conducted the only sanction test for testing the usefullness of liquid hide glue, a bead of glue on paper, cooked in a 150 degree [F] oven for 15 to 20 minutes and allowed to cool.  To my surprise it cracked indicating it was still good.

glue test

It had not been stored in  special conditions although the shop never got real hot.  Good idea to test before you throw it away.

Stephen

August 8, 2014

Loom repair

Filed under: Hardware,Historical Material,Of Interest,Restoration,Techniques,Uncategorized,Wood — Stephen Shepherd @ 9:16 am

loom

A friend for whom I have done repairs on spinning wheels brought me a loom she had got from India made of teak.  The problem was that it would not lock adequately into the upright position.  I examined the loom and determined that the slotted machine screws just spun as the wingnuts were tightened.

The loom was actually quite well made, except for the white plastic parts, but they just couldn’t or didn’t figure out all of the details.  So I decided that two of the four machine screws in question could be replaced with simple carriage bolts.  I used a square file to make the bolt go into the hole without splitting the wood, and that worked out fine.

loombolts

However the other two machine screws could not be replaced with ordinary carriage bolts, so I had master blacksmith Mark Schramm weld on tabs on both sides of the square top of the carriage bolts.  I had to remove one of the shed spacers in order to remove the old screws and insert the new tabbed carriage bolts.

Once they were in place I repositioned the spacers in the proper location, put it back together and low and behold it works.  And the happy customer brought me this hand spun dishtowel that she had made on the loom.  Thank you.

loom1

Stephen

July 31, 2014

300 year old Brick

Filed under: Alchemy,Finishing,Historical Material,Of Interest,Techniques,Uncategorized — Stephen Shepherd @ 1:21 pm

brick1

Top viewbrick2

Side viewbrick2a

Other side view

brick3

End view

Eight and 1/2 inches long, 4 3/16 inches wide, and 2 3/16 inches thick, plus or minus a bit as it is 300 years old.   Sent to me by my friend Sir William from the East coast as an ingredient for an old recipe for cutler’s cement that calls for brick dust.

It is a very hard brick and if you look closely you can see the shells from the lime making process in the matrix of the brick.  The brick weighs 5 pounds. Seems a shame to grind it up, but it will give me a chance to test out my new cast iron mortar and pestle, and there apprently are more available.

I will report the results of the cutler’s cement recipe trials as they happen.

Stephen

July 20, 2014

New Shop Tool

Filed under: Historical Material,Of Interest,Proper Tools,Shop,Uncategorized,Wood — Stephen Shepherd @ 11:33 am

new shop toolYes it does match my other maple octagonal tapered handles on my chisels and dovetail saws.  This has been on my list since childhood.

It is not a caliper, it is not a tuning fork, it is not a truncated trident, it is not a gimble, it is not a frog gig, it is not a boot jack, it is not an oar lock, it is not a pattern for a flyer [although I did use a flyer for the layout], it is not a crutch, it is not a stirrup, it is not a gun rest, it is not an equitorial mount and it is not brought to you by the letter ‘Y’.  What is it?

Stephen

July 15, 2014

Emergency Tool Repair

Filed under: Historical Material,Of Interest,Proper Tools,Restoration,Uncategorized — Stephen Shepherd @ 1:40 pm

Alas after nearly 10 years my ‘hand of death’ flyswatter is getting a bit limp in the wrist.  I personally take a hand in the demise of the flies.

flyswatter1

It has a hickory handle, waxed linen thread ‘netting’ the handle with a one piece leather strap.  The leather hand is held to the hickory handle with an iron staple that is clinched.  I straightened out the staple, removed the old hand and replaced it with a new one.

flyswatter2

Now it is ready for the nasty flying bugs.

Stephen

July 1, 2014

Five Awls – Hudson Bay Company trade awls

The first picture is of an accurate copy of the Hudson Bay Fur Company trade awls sold by the hundreds to Native Americans in the late 18th and early 19th centuries in North America.  It was made several years ago by my friend Richard James, I handled it up and made the leather sheath.

hudson bay awl

The one pictured below is made by master blacksmith Mark Schramm for me, like I need another awl.

5 awls

I also handled up 4 awls for him to sell, the handles are curly maple.  I rough shaped them with a rasp then scraped them smooth.  The hole is drilled with a small gimblet bit, drills great in end grain and makes the proper shaped hole.  I then heated up one of the awls to cherry red and burned the tapered hole for a perfect fit.

They are finished with Moses T’s Gunstocker’s Finish.  Mark will be selling them at an upcoming event over the Fourth of July Weekend.

Stephen

June 26, 2014

Distaff Cup – for sale

This is a wheel that a friend found at the dump and gave it to me to restore.

dumpwheel

The wheel will eventually be for sale, it is on the back burner, as other jobs are in the queue first.  Here is a photograph from Southern Antiques and Folkart by Robert Morton showing a tin distaff cup.

distaff cup

I asked master blacksmith and tinsmith Brian Westover to make one for my wheel and also some for sale.

distaff cup1Here is what it looks like on the lower part of the yet unfinished distaff, a small peg slides out under the distaff to hold it in place.

distaff cup2

I will work on it when I get some free time between other projects.

You can order a distaff cup here.

Stephen

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