Full Chisel Blog

August 21, 2014

Spinning Wheel Maiden repair

This is a maiden from a Canadian Production Wheel and had been previously repaired.  It was repaired with hide glue but the small bamboo skewer just wasn’t big enough to reinforce the joint.

maiden1

I had to remove a nail holding the stub of the tenon on the end of the off-side maiden.  Instead of making a new maiden, I decided to use a shouldered tenon and make it match the original.  With the nail removed I could remove the stub tenon.

maiden2

I cut the maiden off flush at the shoulder for the end of the maiden, then drilled a 1/4″ twist auger and then enlarged it with a 3/8″ duck bill spoon bit.  I fit the new birch tenon into the hole, applied hide glue and clamped it together.

maiden3

I also drilled a hole with a gimlet bit for the wedge and made a new one of birch to match the original

maiden4

The next day I applied pigmented shellac to match the original finish on the parts exposed.  The customer was happy.

Stephen

 

August 17, 2014

Expired Liquid Hide Glue, good after 13 years!

Filed under: Alchemy,Hide Glue,Historical Material,Of Interest,The Trade,Uncategorized — Stephen Shepherd @ 4:28 pm

A friend of mine showed me a bottle of Franklin/Titebond Liquid Hide Glue with an old expiration date and he thought it was still good.  I looked at the date and it was 7-01 and I thought  there was no way it was any good.  So I did the finger/thumb test and sure enough it exhibited ‘legging’ or ‘cottoning’ indicating it was still good.

Webbing

So the following day I conducted the only sanction test for testing the usefullness of liquid hide glue, a bead of glue on paper, cooked in a 150 degree [F] oven for 15 to 20 minutes and allowed to cool.  To my surprise it cracked indicating it was still good.

glue test

It had not been stored in  special conditions although the shop never got real hot.  Good idea to test before you throw it away.

Stephen

July 22, 2014

I can own an Atlatl…

I can and do own a root burl war club, I own a Pueblo rabbit stick, I own a tomahawk, I own a bow and arrows, I own a 1842 Springfield musket, I own a 1848 Colt pocket pistol, I own a 1860 English double barrel 12 gauge shotgun, but I Can Not own a slingshot [county law].  Not sure about my David/Goliath sling?

new shop tool1

I made this from maple to match the tapered octagonal handles of the rest of my shop tools, oak dowels are glued [fish glue] in to the ends of the forks.  Natural gum rubber tubing, a piece of leather and linen thread to secure all the parts.  It is finished with Moses T’s Gunstocker’s Finish.

new shop tool2

However because it is illegal, I have not weaponized the flipper.

Stephen

June 13, 2014

Spinning Wheel Repair – Bobbin Shaped Object

A customer sent me a flyer, whorl, and ‘bobbin’ for repairs to the whorl and requested three [3] new bobbins for her Canadian Production Wheel.  When I received it in the mail, I took off the whorl [it has left hand threads] and the ‘bobbin’ came apart like no other bobbin I had ever seen before and you can believe I have seen a lot of bobbins.

bobbin shaped object

As you can see from the picture the center shaft of the bobbin is butt joined to the pulley end rather than the traditional round socket holes and tenons on both ends?  I found this very curious and thought that whoever sold the wheel put this ‘bobbin shaped object’ in place in order to sell the wheel.  I notified the owner, who contacted the seller, who got in touch with me.

Apparently the seller had purchased it from a known collector on the East coast and had made sure the wheel was functional and did not notice the suspect bobbin prior to selling it to my customer.

I am convinced it was not done to deceive and I think everything is smoothed out with the seller [who wants me to do some work for them] and the project progresses.  I contacted a local friend and she lent me an original CPW bobbin to copy, so the new ones will look right and are constructed using original techniques.

whorl repair

You can see the chip in the whorl in the above photograph.  I marked out a dovetail Dutchman repair on the whorl, then using a small sharp knife cut the end grain birch to the right shape.

whorl repair1

I then cut a piece of end grain birch to fit into the dovetail and glued it in with Fish Glue.

whorl repair2

After the glue dried I shaped it to match the original whorl.

whorl repair3I will stain it to match the original color.

first bobbin

Here is the first of three bobbins, I still have to glue them together and finish them with Moses T’s Gunstocker’s Finish.  The bobbins are made out of cherry and I will put them in the sun for a tan, no stain.

Stephen

June 1, 2014

Spindle Wheel – New Mother-of-All, and Spindle, finished

I have completed the new mother of all and spindle for the spinning wheel from Florida, time to pack it up and ship it home.

The flange and power pulley are turned of maple, then fit and the pulley turned to its final dimension.  The metal spindle from master blacksmith Mark Schramm was roughened up where the flange and pulley are attached, then washed with alcohol and etched with a fresh clove of garlic.  I used Fish Glue to attach them together.

spindle head4

spindle head5

With the parts all turned up and fit, I drilled the holes for the braided corn husk bearings and started the finish schedule.  The first coat is yellow ocher in Moses T’s St. John’s Oil followed by a sealing coat of burnt umber and shellac.

spindle head6

Then a coat of Moses T’s St. John’s Oil with burnt umber, then a thin seal coat of straight shellac.

spindle head7

The last color is of course black iron oxide in Moses T’s St. John’s Oil and allowed to dry.  Both the Birch and reclaimed Chestnut match the original color now.

spindle head8

Ready to pack up and ship.

Stephen

 

 

May 27, 2014

Spindle Wheel – New Mother-of-All, and Spindle

spindle head0This is a photograph sent in by a customer and in need of a new spindle head, maidens, and mother of all, and spindle.  They sent me the tension device on the left, an unusual two standard model with a tilting head and tightening nut to provide drive band tension.

spindle head1The uprights [standards] are made of chestnut, the block is birch and the nut is white oak, an American Wheel.  There is a name stamped on the end of the table, hard to see or tell exactly what it is but perhaps ‘NORTON’.  The new upright post that fits it the block is reclaimed chestnut and the Mother of All cross piece is birch.

I had to make a tapered reamer to match the tapered socket hole in the block, the first one was from soft maple and shattered during the third hole.  A new one of hard maple works much better.

tapered reamer1A slot is cut in the center and the blade is from an old saw and is draw filed square on the edge profile, it has four cutting edges and is used in both directions.

tapered reamer2The two maidens are also made of reclaimed chestnut and these are turned to fit the holes that have been reamed out with the above reamers.

spindle head1a

Here is how the detail on the maiden looks, after details on the existing standards.

spindle head2And here is the entire mother of all with the exception of the metal spindle, flange and drive pulley.  I will finish this piece first, the flange and pulley are made of maple which requires a different finish schedule.

spindle head3I will also permanently attach the single upright post into the birch cross piece with hide glue and a wedge, a little too small for a peg, either method is appropriate.  The maidens are just friction fit as is the mother of all into the tension block.

I also have to drill holes in the maidens to hold the corn husk bearings.

Stephen

May 25, 2014

Fairbanks Home – finished ready to install

The door and 3 lower sash windows after being treated with Moses T’s St. John’s Oil were primed with an oil based primer.  The door was then painted on off white yellow color on the inside as were two of the sashes.  One sash is painted the grey color on one side and white on the other.

sash and door complete

kitchen door exterior painted

The door was painted grey on the outside.  The window panes were set in glazing putty, secured with zinc points and the putty applied to the outside.  The photograph showes the putty ready to be knifed, this was done by Mr. Jones my helper.  I told him it looked like a bad cake frosting job, but it cleaned up just fine.

sash with glazing

Will be installing the door and windows tomorrow.

Stephen

May 17, 2014

Fairbanks Home – door and window sashes

I covered the first phase of the restoration work here.  After the door was stripped of the old paint and cleaned up, several repairs were made using liquid hide glue.  After the glue dried and the surfaces were brought to the correct level, it got several coats of Moses T’s St. John’s Oil, it ended up soaking up a quart of the oil/turpentine mix.

kitchen door repaired

The lower window sashes needed to be replaced and when removing them all of the lower rails did not come out with the rest of the sash, there was so much rot.  The damage is evident on the lower right hand corner of the photograph below.

kitchen window2

The rails and styles are mortised and tennoned together and the mullions are mortised, tennoned and coped to fit the details of the moldings.

new kitchen window sash

lower window sash

window sash oiled

Here are the three lower sashes, glued, pegged, trimmed to size and given a coat of Moses T’s St. John’s Oil. Once the oil has dried the door and sashes will be given an oil based  primer coat, followed after it dries with the finished oil based final coat of paint to match the paint in the house.

Stephen

 

April 22, 2014

I have 4 spinning wheels in my shop right now!

kk2

With a couple in the queue, so I need to get busy.  Here is one I just recently completed, a kit wheel, very well made in the style of the 1850′s.  It was in need of lubrication, a tune up and a new drive band.  The customer also ordered 5 additional bobbins for hours of uninterrupted spinning.

kk1

The bobbins are made of cherry, glued together with hide glue and finished with Moses T’s Gunstocker’s Finish.  The weather has turned nice so I put them out for a bit of a suntan.  I will not stain them as they will darken with time.

Stephen

April 10, 2014

Canadian Production Wheel – Bobbins

A quick job came in the shop, a request for two additional bobbins for a Canadian Production Spinning Wheel.  Also made a peg to hold the crank and provided a ‘chicken nut’ and bolt for the clam shell tension mechanism.

cpw1

The first coat was a mixture of Moses T’s St. John’s Oil and red iron oxide and yellow ocher.  I allowed this to dry overnight, then a light sanding.

cpw2

I then sealed it with shellac followed by a coat of Moses T’s St. John’s Oil and burnt umber.  The weather was so nice I put them outside to dry.

cpw3

Then a thin coat of Moses T’s St. John’s Oil and black iron oxide.  Turned out fine and the customer was happy.

cpw4

Stephen

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