Full Chisel Blog

April 22, 2014

I have 4 spinning wheels in my shop right now!

kk2

With a couple in the queue, so I need to get busy.  Here is one I just recently completed, a kit wheel, very well made in the style of the 1850′s.  It was in need of lubrication, a tune up and a new drive band.  The customer also ordered 5 additional bobbins for hours of uninterrupted spinning.

kk1

The bobbins are made of cherry, glued together with hide glue and finished with Moses T’s Gunstocker’s Finish.  The weather has turned nice so I put them out for a bit of a suntan.  I will not stain them as they will darken with time.

Stephen

April 10, 2014

Canadian Production Wheel – Bobbins

A quick job came in the shop, a request for two additional bobbins for a Canadian Production Spinning Wheel.  Also made a peg to hold the crank and provided a ‘chicken nut’ and bolt for the clam shell tension mechanism.

cpw1

The first coat was a mixture of Moses T’s St. John’s Oil and red iron oxide and yellow ocher.  I allowed this to dry overnight, then a light sanding.

cpw2

I then sealed it with shellac followed by a coat of Moses T’s St. John’s Oil and burnt umber.  The weather was so nice I put them outside to dry.

cpw3

Then a thin coat of Moses T’s St. John’s Oil and black iron oxide.  Turned out fine and the customer was happy.

cpw4

Stephen

March 3, 2014

Walking Wheel Spindle Head Repair III

The walking wheel spindle head repair is complete and now that I have a proper size mailing box I will put it into the post soon.  Here is the first part, and here is the second part.spindle head12This is the small pulley repair with its first coat of stain to match the original.

spindle head3a

This is the pulley with the final stain and ready for the installation of the whorl, end, or flange of the iron spindle.  I first roughened up the area where the whorl will be fixed, then I washed it down with alcohol and etch the metal and the inside of the maple whorl with a fresh clove of garlic.  It is attached with Fish Glue.

spindle head7a

The whorl glued in place with its first coat of Moses T’s St. John’s Oil and yellow ocher dry powdered pigment.  I allowed 24 hours to dry before moving on to the next step.

spindle head7b

A coat of thinned shellac and a coat of burnt umber dry powdered pigment with a bit of Moses T’s St. John’s Oil.

spindle head13

Another thin coat of shellac then some Oil with black iron oxide which was allowed to dry overnight.  The final coat was thin shellac.

spindle head14

I had prepared the braided corn husks for the bearings and attached them with hemp string.  I will include a couple extra braided corn shuck bearings for future replacement when and if necessary.  I also included a hemp drive band treated with Drive Belt Dressing.

Job done.

Stephen

 

February 26, 2014

Drive Belt Dressing

This stuff use to be available when tools and mills were powered by flat leather belts, jack shafts, and flywheels.  It keeps the belt tracking properly [providing the wheels are coplanar] and prevents the belt from slipping.

drive belt dressing

Works great on Foot Powered Treadle Lathes, sewing machine belts and drive bands on Spinning Wheels.  Based on an old formula this stuff is very sticky, it sticks to silicone, teflon and high molecular plastic, etc. etc.

drive belt dressing1

The perforated paper tube keeps it from sticking to your fingers and can be peeled back as the belt dressing is used up.

And it is for sale at The Full Chisel Store.

Stephen

 

February 19, 2014

Walking Wheel Spindle Head Repair II

I started talking about this restoration here.   I made a drawing for making a new maple whorl [head or flange] on the spindle.spindle head4

This is the whorl temporarly fit to the metal spindle, I will later roughen the spindle slightly, etch with garlic and glue in place with Fish Glue.  spindle head7

Here is what the mother-of-all looked like when it arrived, I discussed replacing the obviously newer maiden with a proper one.  My client said that would be fine but insisted as much of the original should be maintained, music to my ears.

spindle head1

Here is the new replacement in birch to match the original.

spindle head6

In order to get the finish to match the original it took several steps, the first is a mixture of Moses T’s St. John’s Oil and yellow ocher dry powdered pigment.

spindle head9

The next step is a coat of shellac with some burnt umber dry powdered pigment.

spindle head10

Then a bit of black iron oxide dry powdered pigment with shellac to get near the final color.

spindle head11

Then some abrasion of the shiny finish and a coat of wood ashes makes it a good match to the original, there is no way to do this in one step to match the old finishes.

Here is the damaged pulley on the shaft together with the replacement part and the pattern that matches what is remaining on the original.

spindle head8

Having fit up the two pieces, I etched them with garlic and glued them in place with Fish Glue.  It was impossible to clamp so I held it in my hands for 10 minutes then set it aside to cure.  A little work with a chisel and I gave it a coat of shellac with burnt umber pigment.  I will add a bit of black later.

spindle head12

I still need to braid up a couple of corn shuck bearings and tie them onto the maidens.  This is an unusual method of attaching the bearings, most are secured through a hole and fixed with a wedge.

spindle head5

I was able to fit the pieces back together to determine just how they were tied on.  This job is nearly complete.

Stephen

 

February 1, 2014

Walking Wheel Spindle Head restoration

After discussing the work via email, the owner sent me the mother-of-all for a walking wheel [wool wheel, or spindle wheel] for restoration.  It is an unusual spindle in that the corn shuck bearings are tied to the maidens, rather than being fixed through a hole with wedges.  It was missing the whorl [head or flange], the small pulley was damaged and one of the maidens was a replacement.

spindle head1

Here is a drawing of what the whorl will look like.

spindle head4

The owner insisted that the pulley be repaired rather than replaced, a person after my own heart, so turned up a piece that can be cut up for the repairs to the pulley.

spindle head2

spindle head3

Should be a fun little restoration project especially that tiny repair to the pulley.

Stephen

 

 

January 9, 2014

Distaff design

While I should be working on the Black Beauty leg [which I intend to do later today], but I want to work on the design of the distaff for the wheel I am restoring for myself [and will be for sale].

distaff

The original part is all that is left, so I will have to turn the other two pieces that hold this as well as turn the finial and make the 4 ribs of the birdcage.  Made of birch the part remaining also has a peg [cut off now] that holds a donut cup for water to help lubricate the flax during spinning.  I am having the water cup made by a local tinsmith.

What do you think of the design I came up with for the finial?  I copied the profile of the lower part, but not sure if it should have a lower pendant or not?

Stephen

November 27, 2013

Spinning Wheel leg[s] repair

This is a wheel I have been working on for a while, it is a painted lady, base coat of green paint followed by a coat of black paint and lots of grease [lanolin] on some parts.  It had suffered from powder post beetle infestation and the bottoms of the legs were in bad shape.  The legs and other parts are made from beech.

I needed to replace a large part of one leg and add on to the other two legs.  The long repair took place after I removed the damaged portion of the leg, this included the hole where the treadle axle pivots.  The damaged axles had rinded out the pivot hole and will require replacement and repair, this I will show in a later post.

I posted about the turned leg part here.  Here is the photograph of the cut being made; the turned leg is held in V-blocks held in my patternmaker’s vice.

leg repair1

I actually got a fairly square cut considering I was eye-balling the cut, it took just a little work with a chisel to get a good joint.

leg repair2

There is still some worm damage in the leg but the wood is not as punky as the lower part of the leg.

I used the V-blocks to hold the leg upright so I could drill a 1/2″ hole down the center {I wish I had my new doweling jig}, using my Fray & Pigg coachmaker’s brace.  I eye-balled the hole by sighting down at 90 degree angles.

leg repair3

Then a little chisel work and it came out fine.

leg repair4

The replacement part is extra long and will be cut off later.

 

leg repair5

When gluing up some of the Fish Glue came out one of the worm holes.  Also note that the new part is a bit proud.

leg repair6

I took care of the proud part of the new turning with a chisel, it was easy working down the grain, I smoothed off the chisel marks with a card scraper.  I will do a bit of sanding before painting, which I will do when all repairs have been made.

leg repair7

I used my miter block to cut off the damaged ends of the other legs and will scarf on new pieces of beech on the bottom of each leg, the angle worked out at 45 degrees.  If you look closely you can see the thin wafer of wood I removed to get to sound wood.  Note the rinded out axle hole from the treadle.

leg repair8

This photo shows how the scarf joint will look, the piece is longer than it needs to be.

More later.

Stephen

 

November 4, 2013

Repairing worm damage on Spinning Wheel leg

This European spinning wheel has seen a lot of use and some neglect over the years; the current owner is interested in having her [I think all spinning wheels are female, I could be wrong] put in good working order.  Already have made two additional bobbins to match the original, now some work on the structure itself.

tm wheel

The original leg is marked with a white pencil where it will be cut off to receive the new foot.

Made of beech the legs have some wear to them, I will scarf on some beech on the other two feet of the legs; however on one leg the damage and wear is too great and must be replaced.  I will use hide glue to attach the new foot after I drill the hole for the tenon.  [I wish I had my new doweling jig!]  Once it is in place I will determine the proper height and cut it off and drill a new hole for the foot treadle axle.

The original is painted green then black and the new part will be painted to match.

Stephen

October 23, 2013

1805 Turning Bench [Treadle Lathe] Hardware

 

treadle lathe parts

Hardware for the 1805 Turning Bench has been difficult for those people building this treadle lathe to find, so after repeated requests I am pleased to offer the complete hardware package for sale at a very reasonable price.

treadle lathe mandrel1

The hardware made to the specifications of the plans and include the headstock mandrel with a slight variation from the old plans, newer sets of plans will include the change.  The center part of the mandrel is 1 1/8″ in diameter; 1″ on the original, this change gives a shoulder for the bearings.

crank1

The flywheel crank is as specified on the plans and can be keyed to secure on the wheel and is 3/4″ in diameter.

tailstockcrank1

The tailstock crank and locking nut are also the same as on the plans and the square nut is inlet into the wood of the tailstock to prevent it from turning.

Now people will be able to easily complete their own foot powered treadle lathe with this quality hardware.  You can order it from the Full Chisel Store.

Stephen

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