Full Chisel Blog

August 21, 2014

Spinning Wheel Maiden repair

This is a maiden from a Canadian Production Wheel and had been previously repaired.  It was repaired with hide glue but the small bamboo skewer just wasn’t big enough to reinforce the joint.

maiden1

I had to remove a nail holding the stub of the tenon on the end of the off-side maiden.  Instead of making a new maiden, I decided to use a shouldered tenon and make it match the original.  With the nail removed I could remove the stub tenon.

maiden2

I cut the maiden off flush at the shoulder for the end of the maiden, then drilled a 1/4″ twist auger and then enlarged it with a 3/8″ duck bill spoon bit.  I fit the new birch tenon into the hole, applied hide glue and clamped it together.

maiden3

I also drilled a hole with a gimlet bit for the wedge and made a new one of birch to match the original

maiden4

The next day I applied pigmented shellac to match the original finish on the parts exposed.  The customer was happy.

Stephen

 

August 8, 2014

Loom repair

Filed under: Hardware,Historical Material,Of Interest,Restoration,Techniques,Uncategorized,Wood — Stephen Shepherd @ 9:16 am

loom

A friend for whom I have done repairs on spinning wheels brought me a loom she had got from India made of teak.  The problem was that it would not lock adequately into the upright position.  I examined the loom and determined that the slotted machine screws just spun as the wingnuts were tightened.

The loom was actually quite well made, except for the white plastic parts, but they just couldn’t or didn’t figure out all of the details.  So I decided that two of the four machine screws in question could be replaced with simple carriage bolts.  I used a square file to make the bolt go into the hole without splitting the wood, and that worked out fine.

loombolts

However the other two machine screws could not be replaced with ordinary carriage bolts, so I had master blacksmith Mark Schramm weld on tabs on both sides of the square top of the carriage bolts.  I had to remove one of the shed spacers in order to remove the old screws and insert the new tabbed carriage bolts.

Once they were in place I repositioned the spacers in the proper location, put it back together and low and behold it works.  And the happy customer brought me this hand spun dishtowel that she had made on the loom.  Thank you.

loom1

Stephen

July 31, 2014

300 year old Brick

Filed under: Alchemy,Finishing,Historical Material,Of Interest,Techniques,Uncategorized — Stephen Shepherd @ 1:21 pm

brick1

Top viewbrick2

Side viewbrick2a

Other side view

brick3

End view

Eight and 1/2 inches long, 4 3/16 inches wide, and 2 3/16 inches thick, plus or minus a bit as it is 300 years old.   Sent to me by my friend Sir William from the East coast as an ingredient for an old recipe for cutler’s cement that calls for brick dust.

It is a very hard brick and if you look closely you can see the shells from the lime making process in the matrix of the brick.  The brick weighs 5 pounds. Seems a shame to grind it up, but it will give me a chance to test out my new cast iron mortar and pestle, and there apprently are more available.

I will report the results of the cutler’s cement recipe trials as they happen.

Stephen

July 22, 2014

I can own an Atlatl…

I can and do own a root burl war club, I own a Pueblo rabbit stick, I own a tomahawk, I own a bow and arrows, I own a 1842 Springfield musket, I own a 1848 Colt pocket pistol, I own a 1860 English double barrel 12 gauge shotgun, but I Can Not own a slingshot [county law].  Not sure about my David/Goliath sling?

new shop tool1

I made this from maple to match the tapered octagonal handles of the rest of my shop tools, oak dowels are glued [fish glue] in to the ends of the forks.  Natural gum rubber tubing, a piece of leather and linen thread to secure all the parts.  It is finished with Moses T’s Gunstocker’s Finish.

new shop tool2

However because it is illegal, I have not weaponized the flipper.

Stephen

July 1, 2014

Five Awls – Hudson Bay Company trade awls

The first picture is of an accurate copy of the Hudson Bay Fur Company trade awls sold by the hundreds to Native Americans in the late 18th and early 19th centuries in North America.  It was made several years ago by my friend Richard James, I handled it up and made the leather sheath.

hudson bay awl

The one pictured below is made by master blacksmith Mark Schramm for me, like I need another awl.

5 awls

I also handled up 4 awls for him to sell, the handles are curly maple.  I rough shaped them with a rasp then scraped them smooth.  The hole is drilled with a small gimblet bit, drills great in end grain and makes the proper shaped hole.  I then heated up one of the awls to cherry red and burned the tapered hole for a perfect fit.

They are finished with Moses T’s Gunstocker’s Finish.  Mark will be selling them at an upcoming event over the Fourth of July Weekend.

Stephen

May 27, 2014

Spindle Wheel – New Mother-of-All, and Spindle

spindle head0This is a photograph sent in by a customer and in need of a new spindle head, maidens, and mother of all, and spindle.  They sent me the tension device on the left, an unusual two standard model with a tilting head and tightening nut to provide drive band tension.

spindle head1The uprights [standards] are made of chestnut, the block is birch and the nut is white oak, an American Wheel.  There is a name stamped on the end of the table, hard to see or tell exactly what it is but perhaps ‘NORTON’.  The new upright post that fits it the block is reclaimed chestnut and the Mother of All cross piece is birch.

I had to make a tapered reamer to match the tapered socket hole in the block, the first one was from soft maple and shattered during the third hole.  A new one of hard maple works much better.

tapered reamer1A slot is cut in the center and the blade is from an old saw and is draw filed square on the edge profile, it has four cutting edges and is used in both directions.

tapered reamer2The two maidens are also made of reclaimed chestnut and these are turned to fit the holes that have been reamed out with the above reamers.

spindle head1a

Here is how the detail on the maiden looks, after details on the existing standards.

spindle head2And here is the entire mother of all with the exception of the metal spindle, flange and drive pulley.  I will finish this piece first, the flange and pulley are made of maple which requires a different finish schedule.

spindle head3I will also permanently attach the single upright post into the birch cross piece with hide glue and a wedge, a little too small for a peg, either method is appropriate.  The maidens are just friction fit as is the mother of all into the tension block.

I also have to drill holes in the maidens to hold the corn husk bearings.

Stephen

May 25, 2014

Fairbanks Home – finished ready to install

The door and 3 lower sash windows after being treated with Moses T’s St. John’s Oil were primed with an oil based primer.  The door was then painted on off white yellow color on the inside as were two of the sashes.  One sash is painted the grey color on one side and white on the other.

sash and door complete

kitchen door exterior painted

The door was painted grey on the outside.  The window panes were set in glazing putty, secured with zinc points and the putty applied to the outside.  The photograph showes the putty ready to be knifed, this was done by Mr. Jones my helper.  I told him it looked like a bad cake frosting job, but it cleaned up just fine.

sash with glazing

Will be installing the door and windows tomorrow.

Stephen

May 17, 2014

Fairbanks Home – door and window sashes

I covered the first phase of the restoration work here.  After the door was stripped of the old paint and cleaned up, several repairs were made using liquid hide glue.  After the glue dried and the surfaces were brought to the correct level, it got several coats of Moses T’s St. John’s Oil, it ended up soaking up a quart of the oil/turpentine mix.

kitchen door repaired

The lower window sashes needed to be replaced and when removing them all of the lower rails did not come out with the rest of the sash, there was so much rot.  The damage is evident on the lower right hand corner of the photograph below.

kitchen window2

The rails and styles are mortised and tennoned together and the mullions are mortised, tennoned and coped to fit the details of the moldings.

new kitchen window sash

lower window sash

window sash oiled

Here are the three lower sashes, glued, pegged, trimmed to size and given a coat of Moses T’s St. John’s Oil. Once the oil has dried the door and sashes will be given an oil based  primer coat, followed after it dries with the finished oil based final coat of paint to match the paint in the house.

Stephen

 

March 16, 2014

Double Table Spinning Wheel Restoration

 

While I have restored probably well over 100 spinning wheels, this is my first double table spinning wheel restoration.  Of Scandinavian origins this wheel is a close match to this one featured on a Catalogue from a local Daughter’s of the Utah Pioneer Museum.

dt

Sometime during its history the original pitman was replaced with a homemade folk art replacement.  I do think because the pitman was rigid that it caused damage to the two uprights holding the wheel; the sockets in the lower table were both broken.  These were easy to repair as all of the parts and pieces were there, so using Fish Glue I filled the joints, clamped them and washed off the excess glue with a wet cloth.

dt3

dt1

dt2

There was an interesting piece of wood in one of the maidens, apparently to keep the flyer in place.  I had to remove this when the proper sized spindle, flyer, whorl, and bobbin were added.

dt4

The treadle also needed some repair as the end where the pitman is attached had a piece missing.  I shaped a new piece and glued it into place.

dt5

dt6

dt7

I also had to make new leather bearings for the maidens; first a paper pattern to fit the mortise and the leather bearing.  This is for a new spindle, flyer, whorl and bobbin that replaced the missing set.

dt8

I replaced the pitman with one influenced by the one on the original in the local museum.

dt9

The drive band is hemp cord that I washed, stretched, and allowed to dry.  I then treated it with Drive Belt Dressing.

Here are two views of the finished restoration.  This one belongs to a friend of mine who purchased it for $35.00 at a local swap meet and now that it is restored he intends to put it up for sale.

dt11

dt10

 

Stephen

 

 

March 10, 2014

Liquid Hide Glue – freshness test

A foolproof [if that concept is possible] method of testing the freshness of liquid hide glue, that works every time.

Simply put a bead of liquid hide glue on a piece of porous paper and place the paper in a warm oven [150 to 200 degrees [F]] for 15 to 20 minutes, then remove and allow to cool.

When you bend the paper the bead of glue will break if the glue is fresh.  If the liquid hide glue is not fresh it will bend without breaking.

hide glue freshness test

The samples are from left to right liquid Fish Glue, fresh Franklin/Titebond liquid hide glue and finally Franklin/Titebond Liquid Hide Glue that is over 5 years old [two years spent outdoors year round] and the results show the cracking in the two fresh samples and wrinkles and flexibility in the old sample.

An excellent test, the two fresh glues also passed the legging, cottoning, or stringing test, the old glue did not.

Stephen

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