Full Chisel Blog

April 22, 2014

I have 4 spinning wheels in my shop right now!

kk2

With a couple in the queue, so I need to get busy.  Here is one I just recently completed, a kit wheel, very well made in the style of the 1850′s.  It was in need of lubrication, a tune up and a new drive band.  The customer also ordered 5 additional bobbins for hours of uninterrupted spinning.

kk1

The bobbins are made of cherry, glued together with hide glue and finished with Moses T’s Gunstocker’s Finish.  The weather has turned nice so I put them out for a bit of a suntan.  I will not stain them as they will darken with time.

Stephen

March 18, 2014

Lazy Kate

One more thing regarding the Black Beauty spinning wheel restoration, the owner decided she wanted a lazy kate for her wheel as it had the existing upright which from its design was not for a distaff but to hold extra bobbins on the wheel.

lazy kate

I got a rough sketch with the dimensions for the spacing of the iron bars [courtesy Mark Schramm] and did a drawing for the turning.

I then drilled holes, upset some burrs on the ends of the iron rods, washed them down with alcohol, then etched with a fresh clove of garlic and used Fish Glue to hold them in place.

lazy kate1

The birch turning was then stained using Moses T’s St. John’s Oil and burnt umber pigment and allowed to dry overnight.  Next was shellac with black iron oxide for the final finish.

lazy kate2

I will have the owner shoot a picture of the complete wheel and post it later.

Stephen

March 3, 2014

Walking Wheel Spindle Head Repair III

The walking wheel spindle head repair is complete and now that I have a proper size mailing box I will put it into the post soon.  Here is the first part, and here is the second part.spindle head12This is the small pulley repair with its first coat of stain to match the original.

spindle head3a

This is the pulley with the final stain and ready for the installation of the whorl, end, or flange of the iron spindle.  I first roughened up the area where the whorl will be fixed, then I washed it down with alcohol and etch the metal and the inside of the maple whorl with a fresh clove of garlic.  It is attached with Fish Glue.

spindle head7a

The whorl glued in place with its first coat of Moses T’s St. John’s Oil and yellow ocher dry powdered pigment.  I allowed 24 hours to dry before moving on to the next step.

spindle head7b

A coat of thinned shellac and a coat of burnt umber dry powdered pigment with a bit of Moses T’s St. John’s Oil.

spindle head13

Another thin coat of shellac then some Oil with black iron oxide which was allowed to dry overnight.  The final coat was thin shellac.

spindle head14

I had prepared the braided corn husks for the bearings and attached them with hemp string.  I will include a couple extra braided corn shuck bearings for future replacement when and if necessary.  I also included a hemp drive band treated with Drive Belt Dressing.

Job done.

Stephen

 

February 1, 2014

Walking Wheel Spindle Head restoration

After discussing the work via email, the owner sent me the mother-of-all for a walking wheel [wool wheel, or spindle wheel] for restoration.  It is an unusual spindle in that the corn shuck bearings are tied to the maidens, rather than being fixed through a hole with wedges.  It was missing the whorl [head or flange], the small pulley was damaged and one of the maidens was a replacement.

spindle head1

Here is a drawing of what the whorl will look like.

spindle head4

The owner insisted that the pulley be repaired rather than replaced, a person after my own heart, so turned up a piece that can be cut up for the repairs to the pulley.

spindle head2

spindle head3

Should be a fun little restoration project especially that tiny repair to the pulley.

Stephen

 

 

January 23, 2014

My work goes largely unnoticed

Here is the final finish on the Dutchman repair I showed in my last post.  I used pigmented wax to fill in the joint, then worked it over to match the surrounding optical surfaces.

bbtreadle3

bbtreadle4

bbtreadle5

bbtreadle6

 

Stephen

January 12, 2014

Storage of Pliers, pincers, shears, snips and scissors

I have a good collection of box joint pliers and use them regularly, however they were stored with their working ends down in holes in a block of wood that also holds my files and rasps, so they needed a place of their own.

Then I remembered a quote from my first father in law and mentor when it comes to old things, he said ‘don’t forget the great unused storage space in the sky’.

Using some 1/2″ thick pine I cut a length of the 11″ wide board to 18″, drilled holes in the end grain for the pivot hinges, drilled a hole in through the top of my tool cabinet and manufactured a bracket to hold the lower pivot hinge.  I used white oak for the dowels/pivots and there is a single slotted screw holding the bracket to the side of the tool cabinet.

pliers1

I then laid out the pliers/ pincers on one side, they are held with 1″ fine cut headless brads with room for expansion, I already found another pair of box joint pliers to add to the collection.  Then on the other side I put my snips, shears and scissors that I use regularly.

pliers2

This arrangement works nicely, everything easy to see and a place for storage out of the way.

Stephen

January 9, 2014

Distaff design

While I should be working on the Black Beauty leg [which I intend to do later today], but I want to work on the design of the distaff for the wheel I am restoring for myself [and will be for sale].

distaff

The original part is all that is left, so I will have to turn the other two pieces that hold this as well as turn the finial and make the 4 ribs of the birdcage.  Made of birch the part remaining also has a peg [cut off now] that holds a donut cup for water to help lubricate the flax during spinning.  I am having the water cup made by a local tinsmith.

What do you think of the design I came up with for the finial?  I copied the profile of the lower part, but not sure if it should have a lower pendant or not?

Stephen

December 1, 2013

When a Spinning Wheel Treadle Axle becomes a Bifurcated [rinder] Bit

Let’s see how the search engines handle that!  The treadle on the painted spinning wheel I am currently restoring had badly worn axles as well as the wrought iron axles were delaminating and causing problems where they come in contact with the wooden legs.  Other parts of the restoration process are posted here and here.

treadle axle repair1

The nature of wrought iron with its inclusions of slag has resulted in the problems encountered here.  The wrought iron axles have delaminated and caused damage to the beech legs through which the axles pivot.

treadle axle repair3

Here is the damage done to the beech [worm damaged] leg.

treadle axle repair4

The first one I easily removed by grasping it with a pair of pliers, gently twisting and it came right out.  The second one was more of a problem and required some effort to get it loose.  I used a small pointed tool to deliniate a line around the axle between the metal and the wood.  I then put a drop of ethanol alcohol at the junction.  I repeated this several times, while gently twisting the axle with pliers.  After some time it became loose and more time and gentle work the axle came out.

treadle axle repair2

I will use hot hide glue to reattach the new iron axles [provided by Master Blacksmith Mark Schramm].  the tangs of the new axles will be prepared with garlic prior to gluing in place.

Stephen

 

 

November 25, 2013

Interesting Brazilian Rosewood 3 beam marking/mortice gauge – C. Sholl, Pat’d March 6, 1864

A friend of mine picked this up at a local swap meet and I don’t think he gave too much for this Brazilian Rosewood 3 beam marking/mortice/tenon gauge.  Here is a link to Christian Sholl’s Patent.  It is American made and Sholl also patented a 4 beam marking/mortice gauge and some of these are actually made and judging from the prices are quite rare.

gauge3

I have seen a lot of marking gauges in my time, this one is up there in curious designs.  I fiddled with this for a while and it is most difficult to set, the mortice slide adjusts easy enough but getting all three sides in the correct position is a handful.

gauge1

This view shows the triple beams and the pentagonal shape.

gauge2

It has several round brass discs on the opposite side of the fence for wear, two are missing.  It is brass mounted with iron screws and iron/steel scribing pins.

Stephen

 

November 18, 2013

Turned my Peg Board into a finish drying rack

I made this several years ago for clamping odd shaped object using pegs and wedges for tension.  I also have a couple of threaded pegs that allow screw pressure.  I have used it for restoration and repair work as well.  It is 16 1/2″ wide, 36″ long and 1 1/2″ thick yellow poplar with one inch holes spaced over the surface.  I can also use holdfasts in any of the holes.

Recently after finishing with Moses T’s Gunstocker’s Finish some curved stretchers for a table I am working on for a friend, I needed somewhere to place the pieces for the finish to dry with good air circulation.  So I stuck a couple of 1 inch dowels into the holes and they worked to hold the pieces spaced apart.  The weight of the pegboard was sufficient to hold the weight of the stretchers, even set out on the ends of the dowels.

pegboard

An already handy tool has a new ability as a drying rack.

Stephen

Older Posts »

Powered by WordPress