Full Chisel Blog

October 17, 2014

Pre-publication Sale of The Spinning Wheel Repair Book

I am offering a pre-publication sale on the Spinning Wheel Repair Book which is going to the press soon.  I will be delivering these by the first week of December 2014.

Here is a mock up of the cover, color being added as we speak, original artwork by Tim Burnham.

freya1

For the first 25 orders I will include an 8.5″ by 11″ hand impressed copy of the hand set title page by Lauri Taylor of Loose Cannon Press, along with your order.

lauri title page3

The book is 8.5″ by 11″, 77 pages with 160 illustrations and 25 photographs.

The book can be ordered here at the Full Chisel Store, the price is $20.00 plus $6.00 domestic shipping.  International shipping charges apply.  The book will be shipped by early December, 2014.

Thanks to all of those who helped with this publication.

Stephen

May 29, 2014

Boycott this Movie

Filed under: Documentation,Historical Material,Of Interest,Spinning Wheel,Uncategorized — Stephen Shepherd @ 9:08 am

This is the partial dedication to my next book on Spinning Wheel Repair.  I have not mentioned the company by name but you can figure it out; I did this to avoid any legal problems.  Do not support this movie!

Dedication

This book is dedicated to the loving memory of the 44 spinning wheels, new and antique that were destroyed by fire in the production of a recent movie of a classic French/German fairy tale. Those Forty-four will be remembered and lamented as a senseless waste of historic material culture that can never be replaced. There are only a limited number of ‘antique’ spinning wheels and they are just not making them anymore and this large movie production company has eliminated forever these examples. This hits home for me because I restore old spinning wheels and I have done sets and been a property master on movies and commercials and it is indeed possible to make reproduction spinning wheel props that could have served the purpose without sacrificing heirlooms. At least they could have used computer generated images and ‘burned’ those instead of removing from our history extant examples and forever depriving those in the future of their legacy, enjoyment, educational value and historical significance. Had the filming been done in certain countries that have antiquities laws the large company would be criminally liable for their thoughtless actions. This is simply an act of historical vandalism done by the large heartless corporation and they should be held responsible for this tragedy. For a company that is dedicated to animal conservation and preservation, apparently historical objects can be destroyed with reckless abandon. The audacity of this studio is an absolute disgrace This dastardly deed cannot be undone nor forgiven.

Stephen

May 25, 2014

Fairbanks Home – finished ready to install

The door and 3 lower sash windows after being treated with Moses T’s St. John’s Oil were primed with an oil based primer.  The door was then painted on off white yellow color on the inside as were two of the sashes.  One sash is painted the grey color on one side and white on the other.

sash and door complete

kitchen door exterior painted

The door was painted grey on the outside.  The window panes were set in glazing putty, secured with zinc points and the putty applied to the outside.  The photograph showes the putty ready to be knifed, this was done by Mr. Jones my helper.  I told him it looked like a bad cake frosting job, but it cleaned up just fine.

sash with glazing

Will be installing the door and windows tomorrow.

Stephen

May 17, 2014

Fairbanks Home – door and window sashes

I covered the first phase of the restoration work here.  After the door was stripped of the old paint and cleaned up, several repairs were made using liquid hide glue.  After the glue dried and the surfaces were brought to the correct level, it got several coats of Moses T’s St. John’s Oil, it ended up soaking up a quart of the oil/turpentine mix.

kitchen door repaired

The lower window sashes needed to be replaced and when removing them all of the lower rails did not come out with the rest of the sash, there was so much rot.  The damage is evident on the lower right hand corner of the photograph below.

kitchen window2

The rails and styles are mortised and tennoned together and the mullions are mortised, tennoned and coped to fit the details of the moldings.

new kitchen window sash

lower window sash

window sash oiled

Here are the three lower sashes, glued, pegged, trimmed to size and given a coat of Moses T’s St. John’s Oil. Once the oil has dried the door and sashes will be given an oil based  primer coat, followed after it dries with the finished oil based final coat of paint to match the paint in the house.

Stephen

 

May 7, 2014

Fairbanks Home – next phase

Filed under: Documentation,Hardware,Historical Material,Of Interest,Restoration,Uncategorized — Stephen Shepherd @ 3:10 pm

The next phase of restoration of the Fairbanks Home at This is the Place Heritage Park in Salt Lake City, Utah has begun.  The sill, lintle and molding restoration is documented here.

removing kitchen door

The kitchen door and three lower window sashes needed attention.  The original door in the kitchen addition was in need of stripping the many layers of old paint, restoration to the woodwork and reattaching the hardware.

kitchen door outside

kitchen door inside

Here are photographs of the inside and outside of the door.

kitchen door outside stripped

kitchen door inside stripped

And here is what it looks like after the paint is removed.  The large number of nails, 54 in one cleat was surprising.

kitchen door cleat

The three lower window sashes all looked liked like the one in the photograph, the lower rails were rotten and the sash did not stay together.  Two sashes in the original part of the house have a bead detail on the frames and mullions, the window from the kitchen addition has much simpler detail.

window damage

More on the work later, have roughed out all of the rails and styles for the sash frames and the mullions are all finished, so it is time to chop and cope.

Stephen

 

April 22, 2014

I have 4 spinning wheels in my shop right now!

kk2

With a couple in the queue, so I need to get busy.  Here is one I just recently completed, a kit wheel, very well made in the style of the 1850’s.  It was in need of lubrication, a tune up and a new drive band.  The customer also ordered 5 additional bobbins for hours of uninterrupted spinning.

kk1

The bobbins are made of cherry, glued together with hide glue and finished with Moses T’s Gunstocker’s Finish.  The weather has turned nice so I put them out for a bit of a suntan.  I will not stain them as they will darken with time.

Stephen

March 20, 2014

American Spinning Wheel

Because of my interest and work in restoring spinning wheels a reader of this blog gave me a spinning wheel.  It had been sitting around his shop and he figured when he reached room temperature that his children would throw this in the trash, so he sent it to me, thank you.

aw1

The table is made of American White Oak, the legs, uprights, hub, spokes and maidens are made of birch as is part of the treadle with other yet to be determined woods.  The support for the mother of all is made of cherry and what is most unusual is the wheel is made of mahogany.  First time I have seen that wood used for a wheel.

There is damage to the part that holds the mother-of-all that will require attention, I do have the collar.

aw2

Need to make a new leg, one spoke is missing and there is damage to the tenons on the spokes that will require attention.  The spindle, flyer, whorl, and bobbin are in the works.

Stephen

March 16, 2014

Double Table Spinning Wheel Restoration

 

While I have restored probably well over 100 spinning wheels, this is my first double table spinning wheel restoration.  Of Scandinavian origins this wheel is a close match to this one featured on a Catalogue from a local Daughter’s of the Utah Pioneer Museum.

dt

Sometime during its history the original pitman was replaced with a homemade folk art replacement.  I do think because the pitman was rigid that it caused damage to the two uprights holding the wheel; the sockets in the lower table were both broken.  These were easy to repair as all of the parts and pieces were there, so using Fish Glue I filled the joints, clamped them and washed off the excess glue with a wet cloth.

dt3

dt1

dt2

There was an interesting piece of wood in one of the maidens, apparently to keep the flyer in place.  I had to remove this when the proper sized spindle, flyer, whorl, and bobbin were added.

dt4

The treadle also needed some repair as the end where the pitman is attached had a piece missing.  I shaped a new piece and glued it into place.

dt5

dt6

dt7

I also had to make new leather bearings for the maidens; first a paper pattern to fit the mortise and the leather bearing.  This is for a new spindle, flyer, whorl and bobbin that replaced the missing set.

dt8

I replaced the pitman with one influenced by the one on the original in the local museum.

dt9

The drive band is hemp cord that I washed, stretched, and allowed to dry.  I then treated it with Drive Belt Dressing.

Here are two views of the finished restoration.  This one belongs to a friend of mine who purchased it for $35.00 at a local swap meet and now that it is restored he intends to put it up for sale.

dt11

dt10

 

Stephen

 

 

January 26, 2014

Black Beauty Spinning Wheel Restoration, complete

bbcomplete

Well I have finally finished this wheel after much work, as documented here and earlier.  The owner of the wheel had called her the ‘Black Beauty’, and she was until I got into the restoration which was much more involved than I had originally imagined.  The wheel was called ‘Black Beast’ during most of its stay in my shop.  The owner said that if she knew what kind of condition it was in she would never have purchased the wheel.  But that is in the past and now the wheel is in working condition with two extra [new] bobbins and it is good for another 100 years or so.  The wrought iron crank may need some attention in the future.

Everything was done and I put it all together but could not find the tension garter wedge I had previously fabricated.  I then spent more time looking for it on my bench that it would have taken me to make a new one.  So I decided to take the spinning wheel out for this final photograph, then put my vise back on my bench and make a new wedge.  I took the picture, came back in the shop and there in the middle of my bench was the wedge.

Stephen

January 9, 2014

Distaff design

While I should be working on the Black Beauty leg [which I intend to do later today], but I want to work on the design of the distaff for the wheel I am restoring for myself [and will be for sale].

distaff

The original part is all that is left, so I will have to turn the other two pieces that hold this as well as turn the finial and make the 4 ribs of the birdcage.  Made of birch the part remaining also has a peg [cut off now] that holds a donut cup for water to help lubricate the flax during spinning.  I am having the water cup made by a local tinsmith.

What do you think of the design I came up with for the finial?  I copied the profile of the lower part, but not sure if it should have a lower pendant or not?

Stephen

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