Full Chisel Blog

July 31, 2012

Oak Sewing Machine Cabinet Repair (5) Veneer work & applique repair

Finishing the outside veneer repair work, I could easily work off the side grain veneer repairs with a sharp chisel, however the end-grain took some additional work.  I clamped my big plastic glue block to the end of the cabinet at the proper location in line with the edge.  I then used my thin saw and the block as the fence to trim off the end-grain veneer.

I opened the top to clean the inside and do one veneer repair.  It is not often I get to use my Ram’s Horn coachmakers layout curve, but it worked perfect for this repair.  The sweeping curved line is easier to disguise and fun to do.  I clamped the curve on the work, put pencil register marks and using a sharp knife cut through the old veneer.

I then clamped the Ram’s Horn on the veneer over a scrap of wood, using the register marks and using the same knife cut out the new veneer.  Fits perfect, as soon as a small missing piece of substrate dries, I will glue in the new veneer.

I removed the small drawer and cleaned it out.  It has some water damage loose parts, missing glue blocks and the applique on the front was loose and cracked.  I used a putty knife to get some Fish Glue under the applique and on the drawer front and in the crack in the curl end.  I used a spring clamp to hold the crack together and two clamps and a plastic glue block to hold it down.

I hope to start the finish process soon, staining, filling and a coat of shellac or two.

Stephen

July 30, 2012

Oak Sewing Machine Cabinet Repair 4

Filed under: Clamping,Furniture,Hide Glue,Historical Material,Of Interest,Restoration,Techniques — Stephen Shepherd @ 10:31 am

It has been a while since I posted about the repairs on this Singer Sewing Machine, and repairs continue.  I repaired the back side of the top and the edges.  The new veneer is two layers thick to compensate for the thick old veneer.  I used harvested old veneer to make the small repairs.  The V shape on the repairs make them less visible than straight cuts.

I selected the best piece of new veneer for the top with as many medullary rays in the same orientation of the original veneer.

I previously repaired the substrate for the large repair on the left rear of the cabinet top.  I used a file to roughen up the substrate in preparation for laying the new veneer.  Because the new quarter sawn white oak veneer is half the thickness of the old veneer I needed to double up the veneer.

And you can my secret tool for getting perfect cuts on some veneers, yes that is a paper cutter.  I honed the blades prior to making any cuts, works great on the thin stuff, the thicker stuff is harder to get a good cut, being thicker and more brittle than the new veneer.

I then used Lee Valley Fish Glue for the veneer repair.  I used a pallet knife to get glue under the old veneer that had lifted a bit, a zinc glue comb to spread the veneer out on the substrate and a glue brush to spread glue on both sides of the bottom veneer and the underside of the top veneer.  Then with clear plastic clamping blocks I clamped it down.

You can glue squeeze out through the old veneer right next to the new veneer.  I removed the clamps and wiped off the excess from the veneer and clamping block and re-clamped it.

This finishes up all but one small blister repair in the veneer on the top, then on to finishing.  I need to get this job completed.

Stephen

July 28, 2012

Price of Goods in Boston, March 6, 1856 part 4

 

From the Boston Press and Post

 

TOBACCO, per pound,

Kentucky, aprvd.         — 9 @ — 13

Do, Bull’s Eye            — 7 ½ @ — 8 ½

Cuba                            — 17 @ — 20

Do, Principe                — 40 @ — 50

St. Domingo                — 10 @ — 20

Manuf., No. 1              — 18 @ — 22

Do, No. 2                    — 14 @ — 16

 

TURTLE SHELLS, per pound,

India                            4 50 @ 11 00

South American           — @ —

 

TWINE, per pound,

Calcutta                       — 10 ¼ @ — 10 ¾

Seine                           — 21 @ — 23

Sail                              — 23 @ — 25

Sewing                        — @ —

 

WHALEBONE, per pound, – 50 @ — 55

 

WINE, per gallon,

Malaga, dry                 — 75 @ — —

Do, sweet                    — 75 @ — 80

Do, dry and sweet, Kriesler’s brand – 85 @ — —

Sicily, Ingham, L.P.     1 75 @ 2 00

Do, Woodhouse           1 25 @ 1 50

Do, Colli                     1 00 @ 1 10

Do, Florio                   1 25 @ 1 50

Do, other brands          — 90 @ — 95

Madeira                       3 50 @ 8 00

Do, French                  none

Do, Pico, Dabney’s brand — @ 1 00

Real Oporto                2 25 @ 5 00

Catalonia                     none

Sherry                          1 25 @ 4 00

San Luca                      1 00 @ 1 25

Canary                         1 25 @ 2 00

 

WOOL, per pound,

Saxony Fleeces, washed – 53 @ — 58

Smyrna, washed          — 26 @ — 29

Do, unwashed              — 15 @ — 21

Spanish, washed          — 24 @ — 25

Do, unwashed              none

B. Ayres, picked         — 15 @ — 29

Do, unpicked               — 9 @ — 11

Mestizo, washed         — 18 @ — 40

Do, unwashed              — 15 @ — 23

American, f. blood      — 45 @ — 50

Do, 3 ct. blood             — 42 @ — 43

Do, half, do                 — 40 @ — 42

Do, qr. And com.         — 30 @ — 35

Lambs’, superfine, pulled –35 @ — 38

Do, No. 1                    — 40 @ — 50

Do, No. 2                    — 35 @ — 40

Do, No. 3                    — 15 @ — 25

 

ZINC, per pound,

Pigs                             — 6 ¼ @ — 6 ½

Slabs                           — 6 ¼ @ — 6 ½

Sheets                          — 7 ⅞ @ — 8

Sheathing                     — 9 @ —

 

SPECIE

Dollars, Spanish ..       12 @ 15 ad.

Do, Carolus…             8 @ 10   “

Do, Mexican                4 ½ @ 5 ½ “

Gold, American                  @       “

Doubloons                   16 75 @ 17 00

Patriots                        15 75 @ 16 00

Sovereigns                  4 85 @ 4 90

Five Francs                 — @ —

Guineas                       — @ —

Treasury Notes            — @ —

 

EXCHANGE

London, 60 days          9 @ 9 ½ d

Paris                            5f 12 ½ @ 5f 17 ½

Amsterdam, per guild. 37 ⅛ @ 37 ¼

Bremen, per rix dollar 78 ½ @ 78 ¾

New York….par         1-10 dis.

Philadelphia                1-5 @ ¼ dis.

Baltimore                    — @ ¼    “

Virginia                       1 @ 1 ¼  “

Richmond                    2 @ 2 ½  “

Charleston             ¾ @ 1  “

Augusta                 1 @ 1 ½ “

Savanna                 1 @ 1 ¼ “

Mobile                   ¾ @ 1 “

New Orleans          par@ ½ “

Cincinnati              ¾ @ 1 “

St. Louis                ½ @ 1 “

 

Tariff of Duties, payable on the principal articles under the present Revenue Laws.

 

Tariffs vary from free to 40 per cent, these are just a few, and most items have tariffs.

Coffee, Imported from the place of growth in American vessels, or foreign vessels entitled by reciprocal treaties to exception from discriminating duties, also of the growth of the Netherlands possessions, imported from the Netherlands, in the same manner, free.

Glue, and Linseed Oil, 20 per cent, tobacco unmanufactured 30 per cent, tobacco manufactured 40 per cent.

Stephen

 

July 27, 2012

Price of Goods in Boston, March 6, 1856 part 3

This is a rendering of the typographical symbol used in this newspaper for ‘per’.

From the Boston Press and Post

 

COAL, per caldron

Cannel, cargo,             12 00 @ 13 00

Newcastle, do             none

Pictou, do                    none

Sydney, do                   none

Virginia, do                 — @ —

Lackawana, per ton     none

Lehigh, retail,              9 00 @ — —

Cumberland                 5 75 @ 6 00

Schuylkill, red ash       none

Do, white ash              none

 

COCOA, per pound

Caraccas,                    — @ —

Guayaquil                    — @ —

Para                             — @ —

St. Domingo                — 8 ¾ @ — 9 ½

Surinam                       — @ —

Trinidad                      — @ —

Cayenne                       — @ —

 

COPPER, per pound

Pig                               — @ —

Sheathing, Am.            — 32 @ — 33

Do, English                 — 32 @ — —

Bolts                            — 33 @ — —

Braziers’                     — 35 @ — —

Old                              — 24 @ — 26

Yellow Sg. Metal        — 26 @ — —

Zinc Sh’g Metal           — @ —

Do, do, Nails               — @ —

 

CORKS, per gross

Common                      — 6 @ — 12

Velvet                          — 35 @ — 40

 

HEMP, per 2240 pounds

Russia, clean               285 00 @ 290 00

Do, half, do                 — @ —

Do, outshot                  — @ —

Kentucky, dew rotted 170 00 @ 200 00

Do, snow do                240 00 @ 270 00

Do, water do               — @ —

Manila, per pound       — 11 @ — 11 ¼

 

HOPS, per pound

1st sort, 1855               — 7 @ — 8

1st sort, 1854               — @ —

 

LEAD, per 100 pounds

Pig                               7 25 @ 7 37

Bar                              — @ —

Sheet                           8 00 @ —

Foreign Pig                  6 75 @ 7 00

 

PAINTS, per pound

White Lead, ground pure — 8 ¼ @ — 8 ¾

Do, do, extra               — 7 ¼ @ —

Do, do, No. 1              — 6 ¾ @ —

Do, dry, pure               — 7 ¾ @ —

Do, do, No. 1              — 6 ¼ @ —

Spanish Brown, Am.   — ¾ @ — 1

Do, do, English           none

Verdigris                     — 36 @ — 39

Red Lead, Am.            — 7 ½ @ — 7 ¾

Do, English                 — @ —

Ochre, yellow, Fr.       — 1 ¼ @ — 1 ¾

Chrome Yellow           — 17 @ —

Prussian Blue              — 55 @ — 65

Vermillion, Am.          — 18 @ —

Do, Chinese                 1 20 @ 1 25

Do, Trieste                  1 50 @ —

Litharge                       — 7 ½ @ — 7 ¾

Paris White, Am.         — ½ @ —

Do, English                 — 1 ¼ @ — 1 ½

Whiting, fine                — 1 ¼ @ —

Do, common                — 1 ½ @ —

Venetian Red, per cwt — @ 2 25

 

PLASTER PARIS, per ton 2 50 @ 2 75

 

PROVISIONS, per bbl, 4 mos.

Beef, Extra Mess         15 00 @ 15 50

Do, Mess                     13 50 @ 14 50

Do, Navy                     — @ —

Do, No. 1                    — @ —

Do, Prime                    — @ —

Pork, Extra Clear        — @ 20 00

Do, Clear                    19 00 @ 19 50

Do, Mess                     17 00 @ 17 50

Do, Prime                    14 50 @ 15 00

Butter, N.Y. extra        — 25 @ — 26

Do, Vermont                — 25 @ — 26

Do, common                — 20 @ — 23

Cheese, Eng. Dairy      — @ —

Do, Vt., extra               — 10 ½ @ — 11 ½

Do, new                       — @ —

Hams                           — 10 ½ @ — 11

Do, Southern and Western — @ —

Lard, kegs,                   — 12 @ — 12 ¼

Do, bbls.                     — 11 @ — 11 ½

 

SALERATUS, per lb  — 4 ¾ @ — 5

 

SHEETING, per piece, s.p.

Brown                         8 50 @ 9 00

Bleached                     9 75 @ 10 25

 

SOAP, per pound

American, No. 1          — 4 ½ @ — 4 ½

Do, No. 2                    — @ —

Do, No. 3                    — 7 @ —

Castile                         — 11 ½ @ — 11 ¾

Do, American              — 4 ¼ @ — 7

Do, Candia                  — 7 @ — 9

 

SPICES, per pound

Cassia, in mats            — 37 @ — 38

Do, in cases                 — @ —

Mace                           — 82 @ — 84

Nutmeg, No. 1             — 93 @ — 95

Do, No. 2                    — @ —

Cloves                         — 13 @ — 13 ¾

Pepper, Sumatra          — 11 @ –11 ½

Pimento, Jamaica        — 12 @ — 12 ¼

Ginger, ground — @ —

Do, race                      — 5 ½ @ — 6

 

SPIRITS, per gallon

Brandy-Pinet, Castillon & Co. 4 90 @ 14 00

Hennessey                   4 85 @ 8 50

Otard, Dupuy & Co.    4 85 @ 8 50

J. & F. Martell            4 85 @ 7 50

United Proprietors       3 90 @ 4 00

Pellevoisn                   3 90 @ 4 00

Rasteau                        3 90 @ 4 00

A.  Seignette                3 90 @ 4 00

Alex Seignette             none

Bordeaux                     3 00 @ 3 25

American                     — 43 @ — 45

Gin-Fish-weesp          — @ —

Honeysuckle                1 55 @ 1 60

Eclipse Anchor           1 35 @ —

Knickerbocker             1 40 @ 1 45

Boquet                         1 55 @ 1 60

Rynbende Pineapple    1 55 @ —

Double Pineapple        1 45 @ 1 50

Do, Salmon-weesp      1 60 @ —

Do, Nolet Eagle          1 35 @ —

Do, Hour Glass           1 40 @ —

Do, Wheel                   1 35 @ 1 40

Weesp Anchor             1 55 @ —

Do, Swan                    1 40 @ —

Do, American              — 53 @ — 55

Rum-St. George and Hope 1 25 @ —

Do, com. Brands         1 15 @ 1 20

Do. New Eng.              — 45 @ — 46

Whisky, Scotch            2 12 @ 2 37

Do, Irish                      1 60 @ 2 50

Do, Old Monon.          — 75 @ 1 25

Do, common                — @ —

 

STAVES, per long M.

Pipe, white oak, prime 65 00 @ 70 00

Do, do, common          25 00 @ 35 00

Hogshead, white oak, prime 40 00 @ 50 00

Do, do, common          12 00 @ 18 00

Do, red oak                 12 00 @ 32 00

Barrel                          15 00 @ 25 00

Heading                       20 00 @ 30 00

 

SUGAR, per pound

Cuba, white                 — 9 ¾ @ — 10 ½

Do, br. And yel           — 7 ½ @ — 8 ¾

Do, muscovado           — 7 ¼ @ — 8 ¾

Porto Rico                   — 7 ¼ @ — 8 ¾

St. Croix                      none

New Orleans               — 7 ¾ @ — 8 ¾

Brazil, white               — @ —

Do, brown                   — @ —

Manila                         — 7 ½ @ — 7 ¾

Batavia                        — @ —

Loaf, 3 per ct. off,       — 10 ½ @ — 11 ¾

Crushed do                  — 10 ⅜ @ — 10 ½

Powdered do               — 10 ¼ @ — 10 ¾

 

TALLOW, per pound

Am. rendered              — 10 ½ @ — 11

Do, rough                    — 8 @ — 8 ½

Quebec rough              — @ —

South American           — @ —

 

TEA, per pound

Hyson                          — 28 @ — 60

Young Hyson, Canton – 25 @ — 35

Do, do, country            — 36 @ — 75

Hyson Skin                  — 20 @ — 35

Gunpowder                 — 30 @ — 70

Imperial                       — 30 @ — 70

Pouchong                     — 20 @ — 35

Souchong                     — 21 @ — 35

Ningyong                     — 28 @ — 50

Tonkay             — 14 @ — 30

Congo                          — 22 @ — 35

Oolong             — 32 @ — 50

 

TIN, per pound

Banca                          — 33 @ — 33 ½

Straits                          — 31 @ — 31 ½

Plates, com. box,         9 50 @ 10 00

Do, X                          11 37 @ 11 75

More great stuff, I only have one more installment.

Stephen

July 26, 2012

Price of Goods in Boston, March 6, 1856 part 2

 

From the Boston Press and Post

 

 

DUCK, per piece

Alexandrotsky             none

Billibins                      — @ —

Chepotchkins               — @ —

D. Bruisgins                — @ —

Gontsharoff                 none

I Bruisgins                   none

Kinoploff                     none

Massaloff                    none

Plotnikoff                    12 50 @ 13 50

Serikoff                       none

Ravens, Imp.               none

Do, light                      7 62 @ 7 75

Do, heavy                    9 62 @ 9 75

 

DYE STUFFS, per pound

Cochineal                    1 06 @ 1 15

Indigo, Bengl best       1 20 @ 1 40

Do, do, mid                 1 00 @ 1 18

Do, do, Inferior           — 50 @ — 95

Do, Guatemala          — 80 @ 1 20

Do, Manila, prime       — 60 @ 1 00

Logwood, Campeachy, per ton  — @ —

Do, St. Domingo          20 00 @ 21 00

Fustic, Cuba                35 00 @ 40 00

Do, Maracaibo                        — @ —

Do, Savanilla              21 00 @ 24 00

Do, Tampico               — @ —

Brazilletto                   23 00 @ 25 00

Camwood                    — @ —

Hache Wood               37 50 @ 43 00

Nicaragua, Coromandel — @ —

Do, Lima                     62 00 @ 72 00

Sapan Wood                55 00 @ 62 00

Indian Coast do           28 00 @ 32 00

 

GLUE, per pound

American                     — 10 @ — 18

Chinese                       — 18 @ — 17

Russia                         — 14 @ — 18

 

GRINDSTONES, per ton

Finished                      20 00 @ 30 00

Rough                          — @ —

 

GUNNY BAGS, each

No. 1                           — @ —

No. 2                           — @ —

No. 3                           — 14 @ — 14 ½

 

GUNNY CLOTH, per yard – 12 ½ @ — 13

 

HIDES, per pound

Buenos Ayres, dry salted        — 25 ½ @ — 26

Do, wet do                              — 13 ¼ @ — 13 ½

Chili                                        — @ —

Maranham                               — @ —

Maracaibo                               — @ —

Montevideo                             — 25 ½ @ — 26

Pernambuco, dry salted           — @ —

Porto Cabello                          — 19 @ — 19 ½

Rio Grande                              — 25 @ — 25 ½

Truxillo                                   — 19 @ — 19 ½

California                                — @ —

West India                               — @ —

African                                    — 15 @ — 24

New Orleans                           — 15 @ — 15 ½

Deerskins                                — 18 @ — 47 ½

Calcutta, buffalo                      — 13 ½ @ — 14

Do, cow, dry, salted each        — 90 @ 1 00

Do, do, wet, do                       1 12 @ 1 22

Buenos Ayres, horse               1 37 @ 1 62

Goatskins, Cape Good Hope, per pound

24 ½ @ — 25 ½

Do, c. de Verds                       — @ —

Do, Calcutta                            — @ —

Do, Curacoa                            — 45 @ — 50

Do, Patna                                 — 19 @ — 21

Do, Madras                             — 25 @ — 28

 

HONEY, per gallon

Cuba                                        — 72 @ — 80

 

IVORY, per pound

Prime                                       1 50 @ 1 75

Scrivellas                                1 00 @ 1 30

 

LEATHER, per pound

Boston, slaughter                     — 20 @ — 25

Eastern, dry hide                     — @ —

Do, Slaughter                          — @ —

New York, light                      — 23 @ — 24 ½

Do, middling                           — 23 ½ @ — 25 ½

Do, heavy                                — 20 ½ @ — 23

Philadelphia City                    — 25 @ — 31

Do, Country                             — 25 @ — 28

Baltimore City                         — 28 @ — 31

Do, dry hide                            — 25 @ — 27

Calfskins curried                     — 70 @ — 80

Do, In rough                            — 57 @ — 60

Neats, thick waxed, per foot    — 15 @ — 18

Do, light, do                            — 11 @ — 18

Do, heavy, do                          — @ —

Kip                                          — @ —

Black grain                              — @ —

 

NAILS, per pound, 6 mos.

Cut, assorted                           — 4 @ — 4 ½

Do, 3d                                     — @ —

Do, 4th [sic]                               — @ —

 

NAVAL STORES, per bbl

Rosin, extra                             3 75 @ 4 50

Do, No. 1                                2 50 @ 3 50

Do, No. 2                                2 00 @ 2 12

Do, Common, 6 mos.               1 85 @ 1 90

Pitch                                        2 25 @ 2 50

Tar, Wilmington                      3 00 @ 3 25

Do, North Co.                          2 75 @ 3 00

Spirit of Turpentine, per gallon cash   — 44 @ — —

Varnish, bright             — 16 @ — 17

 

OIL, per gallon

Lard Oil                                  — 80 @ 1 10

Neats Foot                               — 75 @ — 95

Sperm, Fall and Spring, un-bleached and bleached 1 90 @ 1 95

Winter, bleached and un-bleached 2 00 @ 2 10

Do, crude, cash                       1 80 @ 1 85

Linseed, Dutch                         — @ —

Do, English                             — 87 @ — 85

Do, American                          — 85 @ — —

Red Oil                                   — 67 @ — 68

Pine                                         — @ —

Olive, Sicily                            1 17 @ 1 18

Palm, per pound                      — 10 @ 11 10 ½

Straits, per bbl                        24 00 @ — —

Bank                                        23 25 @ 23 50

Shore                                       22 00 @ — —

Florence, per case                   — @ —

More good stuff.

Stephen

July 24, 2012

Price of Goods in Boston, March 6, 1856 part 1

 

From the Boston Press and Post

BEESWAX, per pound

White, best,                 — 42 @ — 50

Do, block,                   — — @ — —

Yellow                           — 27 @ — 30

Cuba                            — — @ — —

 

CANDLES, per pound

Sperm, Nan.                                        — 37 @ — 38

Do, New Bedford and Boston             — 38 @ — —

Mould, Boston                                    — 14 @ — 14 ½

Do, extra,                                            — 14 ½ @ — 15

Adamantine                                         — 25 @ — 30

 

COTTON, per pound

New Orleans and Mobile

Inferior, 6 mos,            none

Ordinary                      — 10 ¼ @ — 10 ¾

Mid to good mid          — 11 ¼ @ — 11 ¾

Middling Fair              — 11 ¾ @ — 12

Fair                             — 12 @ — 12 ½

Good Fair                    none

Choice, upland            none

Ord to mid                   — 10 ¼ @ — 11

Mid to mid fair            — 11 ¼ @ — 11 ½

Fair to good                 — 11 ½ @ — 11 ¾

 

DOMESTIC GOODS, per yard

Sheeting, 37 inch         — 6 ¾ @ — 7

Do, 37 inch stout         — 8 @ — 8 ¼

Do, 40 inch do             — 8 ½ @ — —

Do, 48 inch do             — 10 ¼ @ — 10 ½

Do, 30 to 40 in., fine   — 6 ¼ @ — 9

Shirting, 27 to 28 ½ inch, brown         — 4 ¾ @ — 5

Do, 30 inch, stout        — 6 ½ @ — 6 ¾

Do, 33 in., do              — — @ — —

Do, 35 in., fine            — — @ — —

Do, 40 in., do              — — @ — —

Drilling, 30 in., stout   — 8 @ — —

Do, 28 in., blchd.        — 8 ½ @ — —

Jean, 30 in., fine          — 8 ½ @ — 8 ¾

Do, 28 in., blchd.        — 9 @ — 9 ¼

Osnaburgs, negro, 4-4,– 10 ¾ @ — 11

Do, do, 7-8                  — 8 ¾ @ — 9

Linseys, negro             — 15 @ — 23

 

DRUGS, per pound

Alcohol                       — 77 @ — 85

Aloes, Cape                — 19 @ — 21

Do, Curacao                — — @ — —

Alum                           — 2 ½ @ — 2 ⅝

Annatto                        — 22 @ — 30

Antimony, crude          — — @ — 8

Do, Regulus                 — 12 @ — 13

Aquafortis                   — 6 ¼ @ — 6 ½

Argols                         — 13 @ — 27

Arrowroot                   — 8 @ — 33

Assafœtida                  — 8 @ — 18

Balsam, Copaivi         — 30 @ — 35

Do, Peru                      1 87 @ 2 00

Do, Tolu                      — 55 @ — 60

Bark Peruvian             1 70 @ — —

Do, Quill                     — 25 @ — 30

Berries, Persian          — 11 @ — 17

Do, Turkey                  — — @ — —

Bleach’d Powders       — 2 ¾ @ — 3 ¼

Borax, refined             — 28 @ — 28 ½

Do, crude                    — — @ — —

Camphor, refined        — 34 @ — 35

Do, crude                    — 28 ½ @ — 20

Cantharides                 1 92 @ 2 00

Carb. Ammonia           — 15 @ — —

Castor Oil, Am per g.  1 62 @ 1 75

Do, India                     1 62 @ 1 75

Chamomile Flowers per lb     — 30 @ — 33

Copperas                     — 1 @ — 1 ¼

Cream Tartar               — 31 ½ @ — 32 ½

Cubebs                        — 47 @ — 50

Dragons Blood            — 45 @ — 60

Extract Logwood         — 11 @ — 11 ½

Flour Sulphur              — 3 ¼ @ — 3 ½

Fr. Rotten Stone          — 5 @ — —

Gamboge                     — 24 @ — 26

Ginseng                       — 25 @ — 31

Gum Arabic, Bombay  — 8 @ — 13

Do, do, Turkey            — 35 @ — 40

Do, Benzoin                — 20 @ — 30

Do, Copal, large          — 35 @ — 75

Do, do, medium           — 30 @ — 34

Do, do, fine                 — 20 @ — 25

Do, Mastic                  2 25 @ — —

Do, Senegal                 — 15 @ — 17

Do, Shellac, orange     — 12 @ — 14

Do, do, liver                — 9 ½ @ — 10 ½

Do, do, garnet              — 10 ½ @ — 11 ½

Do, Tragacanth            — 18 @ — 75

Iodine                          4 25 @ 4 50

Ipecac Root                 2 12 @ 2 37

Isinglass, Am.              — 44 @ — 77

Do, Russia                   4 00 @ 4 50

Jalap Root                   — 66 @ — 70

Lac Dye                       — 10 @ — 60

Liquorice Paste           — 16 @ — 24

Do, Root                      — 7 ¼ @ — 8

Madder, Umbros         — 10 @ — 10 ¾

Do, crop                      — — @ — —

Do, common                — 9 ½ @ — 10

Do, French ESFF        — — @ — —

Do, do, SFF                 — — @ — —

Do, do, SF                   — 10 ½ @ — 10 ¾

Magnesia, calc’d         — — @ — —

Do, lump                     — — @ — —

Manna, flakes              — 90 @ 1 00

Do, small                     — 60 @ — 65

Do, sorts                      — 45 @ — 50

Myrrh, India                — 20 @ — 25

Do, Turkey                  — 35 @ — 40

Nutgalls                       — 30 @ — 37

Do, white                    — 18 @ — 25

Oil Almonds                8 00 @ 9 00

Do, Anise                    5 00 @ 5 25

Do, Bergamot              2 00 @ 2 12

Do, Caraway               1 75 @ 2 25

Do, Cassia                   3 00 @ 3 25

Do, Cloves                  1 50 @ — —

Do, Lemon                   2 00 @ 2 12

Do, Orange                  1 75 @ 1 87

Do, Origanum              — — @ — —

Do, Peppermint           — — @ — —

Do, Vitriol                   — 2 ¼ @ — 2 ½

Do, Wormwood          — — @ — —

Cod Liver Oil              1 75 @ 2 00

Opium, Egyptian          — — @ — —

Do, Turkey                  4 37 @ 4 50

Otto Rose per ounce   4 00 @ 5 00

Oxalic Acid per lb      — 33 @ — 34

Potash. Bichrom.         — 17 @ — 18

Do, Prussiate               — 28 @ — 29

Do, Hydriodate           4 37 @ 4 50

Pumice Stone               — 1⅝ @ 1⅞

Quicksilver                 — 43 @ — 46

Quinine, sul. per oz     2 60 @ 2 70

Rhubarb, E.I. per lb     2 12 @ 2 25

Sago, pearl                  — 7 @ — 8

Sal Ammoniac             — 3 @ — 4

Do, refined                  — 11 @ — 11 ¼

So, Soda                      — 1 ¾ @ — 2

Sarsaparilla, Hond.     –30 @ — 32

Seammony, Aleppo     6 00 @ 7 00

Senna, Alex.                — 14 @ — 15

Do, East India             — 10 @ — 14

Snake Root, Seneca     — 80 @ — 90

Do, Virginia                — 40 @ — 42

Soda Ash                     — 2 ¾ @ — 3

Do, Super Carb.          — 4 ½ @ — 4 ¾

Sponges, Bahama        — 9 @ — 16

Do, Turkey fine           — 50 @ 1 00

Do, extra fine              1 00 @ 2 00

Sugar Lead, white       — 14 @ — 16

Do, brown                   — 9 ¾ @ — 10 ¼

Tapioca, Para              — — @ — —

Do, Rio                       — — @ — —

Tartaric Acid              — 45 @ — 50

Turmeric                     — 4 @ — 4 ½

Vitriol, Blue                — 10 ¼ @ — 10 ½

I hope you find this as interesting as I do.

Stephen

 

 

 

July 19, 2012

Prices of Wood, Boston March 6, 1856

From the front page of the Boston Post and Press.

BOXWOOD, per ton   60 00 @ 85 00

LIGNUM VITAE, per ton  15 00 @ 20 00

LUMBER, per 1000 feet

East Boards, white pine, No.1  40 00 @ — —

Do, do, No.2   40 00 @ — —

Do, do, No.3   33 00 @ 34 00

Do, coarse, No.3   23 00 @ 24 00

Do, do, No.4   13 00 @ 14 00

Do, Scoots     9 00 @ 10 00

Do, Flooring, southern pine  18 00 @ 20 00

Clapboards, extra   38 00 @ 40 00

Do, clear    33 00 @ 35 00

Do, No.1    17 00 @ 20 00

Shingles, pine, shaved, best   4 25 @  5 00

Do, do, do, 2d qual.    2 25 @  2 50

Do, do, sawn best    3 00 @  3 25

Do, cedar, shaved, best   3 50 @  4 00

Do, do, 2d qual.    2 00 @  2 50

Laths, pine, 1 ½ in.    1 75 @  2 00

Spruce Lumber, at measurement   9 00 @ 11 00

Hemlock do,    8 00 @  9 00

Sugar Box shooks   — 45 @ — 50

Ton Timber, white pine best   6 00 @  8 00

Do, do, ordinary    4 00 @  5 00

Do, do, southern pine   10 00 @ 12 00

MAHOGANY, per foot.

Cuba    — 12 @ — 24

St. Domingo   —   8 @ — 17

Honduras    —   9 @ — 18

[MAHOGANY – At public sale 586 logs Mansanilla at 11 ¾ @38c per foot, 6 mos.]

ROSEWOOD, Rio, per log  20 00 @ 60 00

WOOD, per cord

Eastern hard    6 75 @  7 60

Nova Scotia do    7 00 @ — —

Pitch Pine     6 75 @  7 00

South Shore, hard    7 25 @  7 50

Just to keep things current.

Stephen

 

 

July 16, 2012

Iron & Steel Prices, Boston March 6, 1856

IRON, per ton,

Russia, Old Sable, P.S.I –@–

Do. N. Sable   –@–

Swedes, common assorted 95 00 @100 00

Do, square and extra sizes 105 00@ 118 00

Glendon bar   –@–

English, flat, round & square  –@–

Do, do, refined  65 00@ 75 00

Do, Foundry   –@–

A Forge   –@–

Pig, American, Anthracite –@–

Do, Charcoal   –@–

Do, do Foundry  –@–

Do, Scotch, 1st quality  34 50@ 35 00

Do, do, other qualities  –@–

Sheet, English, per pound -13 ½ @-4 ½

Do. Russia   -15 ½ @-16

Boiler, Penn, 1st quality –@–

Do, do 2nd do   –@–

Do, Brandywine best  -6@ -6 ½

STEEL per pound

German, cast steel  -18@ -19

Do, Halbach   -12 ½ @-13

English, best   – 13@ -17

Do, common   -6 ½ @-7

American   – 5@ -7

Check out the difference in prices between iron and steel.  Interesting.

Stephen

 

 

July 12, 2012

Oak Sewing Machine Cabinet Repair – III

A couple of corners of the lid are damaged down through the substrate veneer, the front corner had a small piece of the substrate missing and I replaced it with some very thick veneer and clamped it in place.  After it dried, I trimmed it with a sharp chisel before matching a piece of harvested veneer.

 

 

 

 

 

I harvested some veneer from the back corner of the sewing machine cabinet top.    I used a veneer saw to cut the veneer next to the lid.  I then used a hot clothes iron to soften the original hide glue and with the help of a pallet knife successfully removed the piece of quarter sawn white oak veneer.  It did have a split and a couple of fractures which I used veneer tape to hold together until I glued it down.

I did some minor gluing with liquid Fish Glue on the substrate veneer in the area where I harvested the veneer.  Again using clear plastic glue blocks, the glue doesn’t stick to them and you can see how it looks under clamp to insure it doesn’t move.

I usually do veneer repairs with slanted or angled joints, but on this one I tried a slightly curved cut on the end grain joint, this follows the medullary rays.  While I was cutting the old brittle veneer I had to strengthen some splits with veneer tape.

Using spanner beams to apply pressure where needed on the clear plastic glue blocks and I think it turned out alright.

I still have to trim it and do a couple more small chip repairs.  It is coming along nicely.

Stephen

 

July 10, 2012

Oak Sewing Machine Cabinet Repair – II

The edge substrate, and veneer repair went well, now it is time to repair the main split.

I used the same technique with a pallet knife to introduce the Fish Glue under the veneer, making sure both surfaces and all areas in the void have glue.  I then pressed down the clear plastic clamping block and forced out some excess flue.  I wiped off the block and veneer, dried them with a rag then added clamps.  I used the wood beams to force down the ends of the clamp block.

I can work on other areas of repair while this dries today.

Stephen

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