Full Chisel Blog

July 31, 2014

300 year old Brick

Filed under: Alchemy,Finishing,Historical Material,Of Interest,Techniques,Uncategorized — Stephen Shepherd @ 1:21 pm

brick1

Top viewbrick2

Side viewbrick2a

Other side view

brick3

End view

Eight and 1/2 inches long, 4 3/16 inches wide, and 2 3/16 inches thick, plus or minus a bit as it is 300 years old.   Sent to me by my friend Sir William from the East coast as an ingredient for an old recipe for cutler’s cement that calls for brick dust.

It is a very hard brick and if you look closely you can see the shells from the lime making process in the matrix of the brick.  The brick weighs 5 pounds. Seems a shame to grind it up, but it will give me a chance to test out my new cast iron mortar and pestle, and there apprently are more available.

I will report the results of the cutler’s cement recipe trials as they happen.

Stephen

July 22, 2014

I can own an Atlatl…

I can and do own a root burl war club, I own a Pueblo rabbit stick, I own a tomahawk, I own a bow and arrows, I own a 1842 Springfield musket, I own a 1848 Colt pocket pistol, I own a 1860 English double barrel 12 gauge shotgun, but I Can Not own a slingshot [county law].  Not sure about my David/Goliath sling?

new shop tool1

I made this from maple to match the tapered octagonal handles of the rest of my shop tools, oak dowels are glued [fish glue] in to the ends of the forks.  Natural gum rubber tubing, a piece of leather and linen thread to secure all the parts.  It is finished with Moses T’s Gunstocker’s Finish.

new shop tool2

However because it is illegal, I have not weaponized the flipper.

Stephen

July 20, 2014

New Shop Tool

Filed under: Historical Material,Of Interest,Proper Tools,Shop,Uncategorized,Wood — Stephen Shepherd @ 11:33 am

new shop toolYes it does match my other maple octagonal tapered handles on my chisels and dovetail saws.  This has been on my list since childhood.

It is not a caliper, it is not a tuning fork, it is not a truncated trident, it is not a gimble, it is not a frog gig, it is not a boot jack, it is not an oar lock, it is not a pattern for a flyer [although I did use a flyer for the layout], it is not a crutch, it is not a stirrup, it is not a gun rest, it is not an equitorial mount and it is not brought to you by the letter ‘Y’.  What is it?

Stephen

July 15, 2014

Emergency Tool Repair

Filed under: Historical Material,Of Interest,Proper Tools,Restoration,Uncategorized — Stephen Shepherd @ 1:40 pm

Alas after nearly 10 years my ‘hand of death’ flyswatter is getting a bit limp in the wrist.  I personally take a hand in the demise of the flies.

flyswatter1

It has a hickory handle, waxed linen thread ‘netting’ the handle with a one piece leather strap.  The leather hand is held to the hickory handle with an iron staple that is clinched.  I straightened out the staple, removed the old hand and replaced it with a new one.

flyswatter2

Now it is ready for the nasty flying bugs.

Stephen

July 1, 2014

Five Awls – Hudson Bay Company trade awls

The first picture is of an accurate copy of the Hudson Bay Fur Company trade awls sold by the hundreds to Native Americans in the late 18th and early 19th centuries in North America.  It was made several years ago by my friend Richard James, I handled it up and made the leather sheath.

hudson bay awl

The one pictured below is made by master blacksmith Mark Schramm for me, like I need another awl.

5 awls

I also handled up 4 awls for him to sell, the handles are curly maple.  I rough shaped them with a rasp then scraped them smooth.  The hole is drilled with a small gimblet bit, drills great in end grain and makes the proper shaped hole.  I then heated up one of the awls to cherry red and burned the tapered hole for a perfect fit.

They are finished with Moses T’s Gunstocker’s Finish.  Mark will be selling them at an upcoming event over the Fourth of July Weekend.

Stephen

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