Full Chisel Blog

August 20, 2010

New Toothing Plane – finished

Well I got to spend several hours in the shop on my days off and finished up a hand saw and this toothing plane.  I fitted up the blade, then to my horror it stuck out 1/16″ more on one side than the other.  I immediately checked the body of the plane and everything was square, so I checked the iron which was out 1/16″.  A quick trip to the grindstone and everything was square.

I used the pistol grip hand saw that I made to rip out the maple wedge, then worked over the cut areas with a rasp and float to smooth the surface, then gave it a work over with a card scraper.  I then did some more shaping and shot the edges to fit the mortise.  A little more work on the throat and bedding of the iron and the piece was ready for a coat of linseed oil/turpentine [50/50].

I made the entire tool by hand, drilling the holes was the most precise work, together with the mortise for the blade and wedge.  I drilled from both sides to insure proper alignment.  I really need a good throat float, guess I should talk to the Blacksmith.

Also called a Gluing Plane, Veneer Plane, Keying Plane and Truthing Plane.  Not only does it work well for preparing the surface for gluing [with hide glue of course] but also for handling troubling grain like burl, curl and knots without tear out.

This is my second toothing plane, I am numbering my planes because I don’t make that many, but this one was fun and I may have to make one for myself, although I own two original toothing planes.  This one is for a trade and I have made arrangements to meet with my friend tomorrow to complete the trade.  I will post what I get from the trade.

Stephen

2 Comments »

  1. “Also called a Gluing Plane, Veneer Plane, Keying Plane and Truthing Plane. Not only does it work well for preparing the surface for gluing [with hide glue of course] but also for handling troubling grain like burl, curl and knots without tear out.”

    A glue/veneer/keying plane is an entirely different tool to a toothing/truing plane. The former has a blade with very fine ‘V’ grooves for cutting shallow lines in the back of veneer and the face of groundwork which is to be veneered to assist with glue adhesion.
    See:
    http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?p=48431&cat=1,41182,48945
    and
    http://www.lie-nielsen.com/catalog.php?sku=112

    The latter has a blade with (usually) equal width teeth and gullets which is used penultimately for finishing difficult grain prior to final passes with a smoothing plane.
    See:
    http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?p=51870&cat=1,41182,52515
    and
    http://www.lie-nielsen.com/catalog.php?grp=1261

    If a toothing plane is used for preparing veneer and groundwork, the glue in the channels left by the plane teeth can, over time, contract sufficiently to draw thin veneer down into the channels, creating the unsightly ‘ploughed field’ effect on the surface of the veneer.

    Comment by Jack Plane — August 21, 2010 @ 1:46 am

  2. Jack,

    Welcome and that is an interesting distinction. I do know luthiers use toothed blades in their planes for dealing with curly wood, but in the historic record the only thing I see is that toothing blades were offered in coarse, medium and fine tooth. I have seen toothing marks that are 48 teeth [serrations] per inch. However if held at a skew even a coarse toothing blade produces finer scratches.

    Stephen

    Comment by Stephen Shepherd — August 26, 2010 @ 7:20 am

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