Full Chisel Blog

March 16, 2014

Double Table Spinning Wheel Restoration

 

While I have restored probably well over 100 spinning wheels, this is my first double table spinning wheel restoration.  Of Scandinavian origins this wheel is a close match to this one featured on a Catalogue from a local Daughter’s of the Utah Pioneer Museum.

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Sometime during its history the original pitman was replaced with a homemade folk art replacement.  I do think because the pitman was rigid that it caused damage to the two uprights holding the wheel; the sockets in the lower table were both broken.  These were easy to repair as all of the parts and pieces were there, so using Fish Glue I filled the joints, clamped them and washed off the excess glue with a wet cloth.

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There was an interesting piece of wood in one of the maidens, apparently to keep the flyer in place.  I had to remove this when the proper sized spindle, flyer, whorl, and bobbin were added.

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The treadle also needed some repair as the end where the pitman is attached had a piece missing.  I shaped a new piece and glued it into place.

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I also had to make new leather bearings for the maidens; first a paper pattern to fit the mortise and the leather bearing.  This is for a new spindle, flyer, whorl and bobbin that replaced the missing set.

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I replaced the pitman with one influenced by the one on the original in the local museum.

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The drive band is hemp cord that I washed, stretched, and allowed to dry.  I then treated it with Drive Belt Dressing.

Here are two views of the finished restoration.  This one belongs to a friend of mine who purchased it for $35.00 at a local swap meet and now that it is restored he intends to put it up for sale.

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Stephen

 

 

2 Comments »

  1. Thank you for posting this. Last summer I won a wheel at an auction up in Nebraska that is uncannily close to the one pictured on the book’s cover down to the color (black) which you supply as an example. I suspected that it was a Scandinavian wheel by the build alone. Thanks for supplying a possible clue as to its origin!

    Comment by Chris Durrill — March 16, 2014 @ 3:03 pm

  2. As always I am impressed by your work. The wheel looks great
    Dave

    Comment by Dave — March 20, 2014 @ 9:55 am

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